Tag Archives: Joyce

A Portrait of Different Colors

“There were lanterns in the hall of his father’s house and ropes of green branches. There were holly and ivy round the pier glass and holly and ivy, green and red, tined round the chandeliers. There were red holly and green ivy round the old portraits on the walls. Holly and ivy for him and for Christmas.” (17-18)

“The word was beautiful: wine. It made your think of dark purple because the grapes were dark purple that grew in Greece outside houses like white temples.” (49)

Joyce, James. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. New York: Huebsch, 1918.Internet Archive. http://archive.org/details/aportraitartist01joycgoog

Notes:

The idea of colors play an important role in both passages. Colors can both represent an event and evoke feelings. Stephen uses the colors red and green for holly and ivy to symbolize Christmas. To conjure up nice thoughts he vividly visualizes what his father’s house would look like and he uses red and green to remind him of what the holidays at home would be. In the second passage he thinks the word wine is beautiful and nice to think about because it makes him visualize the color dark purple. In both instances he uses colors to evoke nice thoughts. The association of color with feelings allow readers to feel a certain way about different colors.

 

semantics

Uncle Charles smoked such black twist that at last his nephew suggested to him to enjoy his morning smoke in a little outhouse at the end of the garden.

James Joyce, “A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man,” (New York: Random House Inc., 1996) 78

Much like the opening of the first chapter, the opening of the second chapter uses the title “his nephew” when speaking of Stephen instead of just saying his name. It’s a similar style of narration to that which we encountered in Melanchta. 

The Freedom in Art & Fiction

But the only condition that I can think of attaching to the composition of the novel is, as I have already said, that it be sincere. This freedom is a splendid privilege, and the first lesson of the young novelist is to learn to be worthy of it. “Enjoy it as it deserves,” I should say to him; “take possession of it, explore it to its utmost extent, publish it, rejoice in it. All life belongs to you…

Joyce, James. ” The Art of Fiction”. Major Stories & Essays. Leon Edel, Mark Wilson, Kohm Hollander, David Bromwich, Denis Donoghue, William L.Vance, Edward Said.  New York: The Library of America, 1999. 592. Print

Notes: no strict rules writers must follow, do not let others tell you how to write. Writing- adventure.