Tag Archives: color

Identity in Their Eyes Were Watching God

“Ah was wid dem white chillun so much till Ah didn’t know Ah wuzn’t white till Ah was round six years old… Whe nwe looked at de picture and everybody got pointed out there wasn’t nobody left except a real dark little girl with long hair standing by Eleanor. Dat’s where Ah wuz s’posed to be, but Ah couldn’t recognize dat dark chile as me. So Ah ast, ‘where is me? Ah don’t see me.’

‘Dat’s you, Alphabet, don’t you know yo’ ownself?'” (Hurston 9).

Hurston, Zora Neale. Their Eyes Were Watching God. New York, New York: Harper Perennial Modern Classics, 2006. Print.

Notes: Janie was confused as to what he identity was as a child. The white family that her family worked for had clear concepts of what defined someone’s identity. Racial divisions.

Color, Imagination, and Childhood

“White roses and red roses:  those were beautiful colours to think of.  And the cards for first place and second place and third place were beautiful colours too:  pink and cream and lavender.  Lavender and cream and pink roses were beautiful to think of .  Perhaps a wild rose might be like those colours and he remembered the song about the wild rose blossoms on the little green place.  But you could not have a green rose.  But perhaps somewhere in the world you could.” (9).

“Fleming had a box of crayons and one night during free study he had coloured the earth green and the clouds maroon.  That was like the two brushes in Dante’s press, the brush with the green velvet back for Parnell and the brush with the maroon velvet for Michael Davitt.  But he had not told Fleming to colour them those colours.  Fleming had done it himself.” (12).

The thing that I saw that was interesting about both of these passages was that they both involve color and what is considered “normal.”  Green roses aren’t normal and so you cannot have one.  In the second passage,  Fleming colors maroon clouds.  He is careful to mention that he hadn’t insisted that Fleming color such a thing.  It kind of brings out the idea of how as kids we’re able to stretch our imagination to where coloring maroon clouds may be normal (or a green rose).  At a certain point, our imagination shrinks and so coloring those things breaks the norms of what we’re used to considering as correct.

Is this wrong…or right ?

“He still tried to think what was the right answer.” (Joyce 11)

– During this scene, Stephen is still hung up and questioning the fact on whether or not what he does is right or wrong… Even tho Stephen maybe feels like a target, he shouldn’t care of what people think. So I think any answer he gives is the right answer.

“The train was full of fellows: a long long chocolate train with cream facings. The guards went to and for opening, closing, locking, unlocking the doors. They were men in dark blue and silver, they had silvery whistles and their keys made a quick music: click, click, click, click.” (Joyce 16)

– The writing style is very fun and different. Color is something that is brought up a lot in this paragraph. Joyce also described everything very well here. It makes the reader really get and understand what is happening on the train.

Notes: questioning, color = descriptive ?,  you shouldn’t care about what people think, enjoy the little details.

Stephen’s Budding Attraction to Color and Beauty

“The tablecloth was damp and limp. But he drank off the hot weak tea which the clumsy scullion, girt with a white apron, poured into his cup. He wondered whether the scullion’s apron was damp too or whether all white things were cold and damp” (pg. 10).

“White roses and red roses: those were beautiful colours to think of. And the cards for first place and second place and third place were beautiful colours too: pink and cream and lavender. Lavender and cream and pink roses were beautiful to think of. Perhaps a wild rose might be like those colours and he remembered the song about the wild rose blossoms on the little green place. But you could not have a green rose. But perhaps somewhere in the world you could” (pg. 9).

Joyce, James. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. New York: Oxford University Press Inc., 2008. Print.

Notes: Early on in the story and at such a young age, Stephen has an affinity for artistry and beauty. While at school, he is unhappy and dreads each day; descriptions of things at school are dreary, weak, damp, wet, cold, white and grey. Within these descriptions of his days at school, there are sparks of passion flowing out of him in the form of stream of consciousness. Something so insignificant as the flowers each boy has pinned on their jackets, and the  he takes an attraction to because he loves their colors, their vibrancy. His excitement or obsession with it takes the form in repeating sentences describing the flowers and their colors, similar to the style of Getrude Stein’s Melanctha. We start to see glimpses into Stephen at a young age where he isn’t fully aware of his own passions, what he is to become.

A Portrait of the Artist as He Paints Descriptions

“White roses and red roses: those were beautiful colours to think of. And the cards for first place and second place and third place were beautiful colours too: pink and cream and lavender. Lavender and cream and pink roses were beautiful to think of. Perhaps a wild rose might be like those colours and he remembered the song about the wild rose blossoms on the little green place. But you could not have a green rose. But perhaps somewhere in the world you could” (9).

 

Joyce, James. (2008). A portrait of the artist as a young man. Oxford, Great Britain: Oxford university press.

 

Notes: The colors of the roses that are being described from Stephen’s viewpoint greatly contrast moments dark and dreary moments in the story . It is interesting to note that Stephen is paying close attention to the colors of the roses as he becomes ill.  Stephen thinking about the potential of a green rose’s existence is his last thought about these colors as the bell rings and his thinking is disrupted.